• Text Size
  • S
  • M
  • L
MBSHLobby 1MBSH 2MBSH 5
News Library
The

Monday, December 23, 2013

The "V Formation"

I was watching the an episode of "Hollowed Ground Outdoors" a few weeks ago with my wife. No, I'm not a hunter but this is a hunting show that our son produces and hunts in, so a proud mom and dad watch the show. That week's show featured our son and some other guys hunting geese in Oregon. There these guys were in a blind, in the cold (you could see their breath) waiting for these birds to fly over and then shoot them.


I was watching the an episode of "Hollowed Ground Outdoors" a few weeks ago with my wife. No, I'm not a hunter but this is a hunting show that our son produces and hunts in, so a proud mom and dad watch the show. That week's show featured our son and some other guys hunting geese in Oregon. There these guys were in a blind, in the cold (you could see their breath) waiting for these birds to fly over and then shoot them.

What interested me was watching the geese flying before their demise. You see, in the Fall of the year you will see geese flying south for the winter in the "V" formation. It has been learned by people who study such things, that as each bird flaps its wings, it creates uplift for the bird immediately following. By flying in a "V" formation, the whole flock adds at least 71% greater range than if each bird flew on its own. Whenever a goose falls out of formation, it suddenly feels the drag and resistance of trying to go through it alone and quickly gets back into formation to take advantage of the power of the flock.

When the lead goose gets tired, he rotates back in the wing and another goose takes over. The geese honk from behind to encourage those up front to keep their speed.

There are two purposes that the "V" formation serves. First, it conserves energy. Each bird flies slightly above the bird in front of him, resulting in a reduction of wind resistance. Second, it is easy to keep track of every bird in the group. Finally, if a goose gets sick or is wounded by gun shot and falls out, two geese fall out of the formation to help and protect him. They stay with him until he is either able to fly again or he dies and then they launch out with another formation to catch up with their group. Here’s the point.

Sometimes living this life gets tough as we are seeking a destination for our lives, whatever that might be. In doing so, often times get tired of the struggle and need others to help strengthen us in order to keep going. When we get sick, we need someone to be there with us to help us get better. New Hope is such a place. If life’s got you down and you feel you don’t have the strength to go on….give us a call at 1-573-860-1601(02). We’re here to help you along life’s journey.

Back