• Text Size
  • S
  • M
  • L
MBSHLobby 1MBSH 2MBSH 5
News Library
Those Holiday Blues

Monday, December 30, 2013

Those Holiday Blues

Well, here we are again, that time of year when families gather together to open presents, eat a hearty meal together  and just enjoy being together.  Or, maybe that does not describe you.  Maybe you dread the coming of holidays. Maybe you have grown to hate the festive music that comes with the holidays. In fact, you may be thinking,  “If one more person says, ‘Merry Christmas’ I’m going to hit them!”  For you, the holidays are not very special at all. Maybe you have lost a loved one. Maybe a dear relationship has ended. Perhaps, because of a divorce, your children are not scheduled to be with you this Holiday Season. Maybe you are facing the holidays being alone for the first time.


Well, here we are again, that time of year when families gather together to open presents, eat a hearty meal together  and just enjoy being together.  Or, maybe that does not describe you.  Maybe you dread the coming of holidays. Maybe you have grown to hate the festive music that comes with the holidays. In fact, you may be thinking,  “If one more person says, ‘Merry Christmas’ I’m going to hit them!”  For you, the holidays are not very special at all. Maybe you have lost a loved one. Maybe a dear relationship has ended. Perhaps, because of a divorce, your children are not scheduled to be with you this Holiday Season. Maybe you are facing the holidays being alone for the first time.

Some people suffer from Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). This is a type of depression that tends to occur (and recur) as the days grow shorter in the fall and winter. It is believed that affected people react to the decreasing amounts of sunlight and the colder temperatures as the fall and winter progress, resulting in feelings of depression. This, accompanied by the holidays, can send an individual into a tailspin of depression and loneliness.

Here are some suggestions for coping with depression and loneliness during the holidays:

  • Make realistic expectations for the holiday season.
  • Set realistic goals for yourself.
  • Pace yourself. Do not take on more responsibilities than you can handle.
  • Make a list and prioritize the important activities. This can help make holiday tasks more manageable.
  • Be realistic about what you can and cannot do.
  • Do not put all your energy into just one day (for example, Thanksgiving Day, New Year's Eve). The holiday cheer can be spread from one holiday event to the next.
  • Live "in the moment" and enjoy the present.
  • Look to the future with optimism.
  • Don't set yourself up for disappointment and sadness by comparing today with the "good old days" of the past.
  • If you are lonely, try volunteering some of your time to help others.
  • Find holiday activities that are free, such as looking at holiday decorations, going window shopping without buying, and watching the winter weather, whether it's a snowflake or a raindrop.

Please remember, the staff at New Hope Behavioral Health is just a phone call away. Call 573-860-1601(02) and let us assist you.

Back